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September 2023

Tuesday, 26 September 2023 00:00

Ankle Pain

The ankle joint is the point at which the bones of the leg and foot join. This joint is crucial because it is responsible for the foot’s mobility. Ankle pain is typically the result of inflammation from an injury to bones, joint space, cartilage, ligaments, tendons, or muscles in the area. Commonly associated symptoms with ankle pain are bruising, redness, numbness, stiffness, weakness, and tingling.

The most common causes of ankle pain are sprains and injuries. Ankle sprains are one of the most common musculoskeletal injuries. Sprains occur when the ligaments of the ankle become partially or completely torn due to sudden stretching. Sprains can occur on either the inner or outer sides of the ankle joint. Usually, these injuries occur when the ankle is twisted in an activity by stepping off an uneven surface. More specific causes include rheumatoid arthritis, gout, osteoarthritis, and Achilles tendonitis.

If you are experiencing ankle pain, you should consult with your podiatrist to choose the best method of care. Your doctor will conduct an examination of your ankle to determine the underlying cause of the pain.

Tuesday, 26 September 2023 00:00

Finding the Right Ankle Brace

When it comes to finding the right ankle brace, it's essential to consider your specific needs and condition. Lace-up support braces are tailored for demanding athletes during their sports activities. These braces offer a custom fit, making them easy to put on and remove. For daily use and mild support, ankle braces in the form of sleeves or wrap-arounds may be helpful. These braces offer compression and stability, making them perfect for those with chronic ankle instability or who are recovering from mild sprains. For high-impact sports or activities that involve quick lateral movements and jumping, ankle braces that offer moderate to maximum support are a choice. These braces often feature side stays to prevent ankle rolls. Maximum support braces even come with semi-rigid shells to prevent further injury while allowing normal movement. In cases of severe injuries, fractures, or post-surgery recovery, a boot or full-shell protection brace offers ankle protection and reduces foot pressure while walking. These devices are not suitable for sports and are primarily designed for immediate recovery. To find the proper brace for your ankle recovery, it is suggested that you make an appointment with a podiatrist to determine the best choice for your specific needs.

Ankle pain can be caused by a number of problems and may be potentially serious. If you have ankle pain, consult with Dale Delaney, DPM from InStride Kinston Podiatry Center. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Ankle pain is any condition that causes pain in the ankle. Due to the fact that the ankle consists of tendons, muscles, bones, and ligaments, ankle pain can come from a number of different conditions.

Causes

The most common causes of ankle pain include:

  • Types of arthritis (rheumatoid, osteoarthritis, and gout)
  • Ankle sprains
  • Broken ankles
  • Achilles tendinitis
  • Achilles tendon rupture
  • Stress fractures
  • Bursitis
  • Tarsal tunnel syndrome
  • Plantar fasciitis

Symptoms

Symptoms of ankle injury vary based upon the condition. Pain may include general pain and discomfort, swelling, aching, redness, bruising, burning or stabbing sensations, and/or loss of sensation.

Diagnosis

Due to the wide variety of potential causes of ankle pain, podiatrists will utilize a number of different methods to properly diagnose ankle pain. This can include asking for personal and family medical histories and of any recent injuries. Further diagnosis may include sensation tests, a physical examination, and potentially x-rays or other imaging tests.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are rest, ice packs, keeping pressure off the foot, orthotics and braces, medication for inflammation and pain, and surgery.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Kinston, NC . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Tuesday, 19 September 2023 00:00

Foot Orthotics

Orthotics are shoe inserts that are meant to correct an irregular walking gait or provide cushioning to the feet.  Orthotics come in a variety of different models and sizes, including over-the-counter and customizable variants. Customizable orthotics can be shaped and contoured to fit inside a specific shoe and are typically prescribed through a podiatrist who specializes in customized footwear and orthotics design and management.

Orthotics are beneficial because they can help prevent injuries from occurring and provide cushioning to keep pain levels down to a minimum. They also allow for the correct positioning of the feet. Orthotics can act as shock absorbers to help remove pressure from the foot and ankle. Therefore, orthotics can make bodily movements, such as walking and running, become more comfortable as well as help prevent the development of certain foot conditions.

Orthotics alleviate pain and make the foot more comfortable by slightly altering the angle at which the foot strikes the ground surface, therefore controlling the movement of the foot and ankle. Orthotics come in different variants and can be made of various materials. To determine what type of orthotic is most suited to your feet and your needs, it is best to consult your podiatrist. He or she will be able to recommend a type of orthotic that can help improve your foot function or prescribe a custom orthotic to best fit your feet.  

Tuesday, 19 September 2023 00:00

Pain Relief From Custom Orthotics

Orthotics are custom-made shoe inserts designed to support and align your feet properly. They can be a game-changer when it comes to reducing foot pain and discomfort. First, custom orthotics provide added cushioning and support to your feet, which can help distribute your body weight evenly. This can alleviate pressure on specific areas, such as the arches or heels, and reduce pain associated with conditions like plantar fasciitis or flat feet. Second, custom orthotics can correct abnormal foot mechanics, such as overpronation, which is rolling your feet inward, or supination, which is rolling your feet outward. Orthotics also can help to align your feet and ankles properly and reduce strain on the muscles and tendons. In addition, orthotics can improve your posture and reduce the stress on your knees, hips, and lower back. This process can indirectly alleviate foot pain caused by poor alignment. If you're experiencing discomfort or pain in your feet, it is suggested that you make an appointment with a podiatrist to determine the type of custom orthotics you may need. 

If you are having discomfort in your feet and would like to try orthotics, contact Dale Delaney, DPM from InStride Kinston Podiatry Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Are Orthotics?

Orthotics are inserts you can place into your shoes to help with a variety of foot problems such as flat feet or foot pain. Orthotics provide relief and comfort for minor foot and heel pain but can’t correct serious biomechanical problems in your feet.

Over-the-Counter Inserts

Orthotics come in a wide variety of over-the-counter inserts that are used to treat foot pain, heel pain, and minor problems. For example, arch supports can be inserted into your shoes to help correct overarched or flat feet, while gel insoles are often used because they provide comfort and relief from foot and heel pain by alleviating pressure.

Prescription Orthotics

If over-the-counter inserts don’t work for you or if you have a more severe foot concern, it is possible to have your podiatrist prescribe custom orthotics. These high-quality inserts are designed to treat problems such as abnormal motion, plantar fasciitis, and severe forms of heel pain. They can even be used to help patients suffering from diabetes by treating foot ulcers and painful calluses and are usually molded to your feet individually, which allows them to provide full support and comfort.

If you are experiencing minor to severe foot or heel pain, it’s recommended to speak with your podiatrist about the possibilities of using orthotics. A podiatrist can determine which type of orthotic is right for you and allow you to take the first steps towards being pain-free.

If you have any questions please contact our office located in Kinston, NC . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 12 September 2023 00:00

What is Flexible Flat Foot?

Flatfoot is classified as having the entire sole of the foot in contact or near contact to the ground while standing. The disorder is also known as fallen arches, because those affected have no arch in their feet. Flexible flatfoot and rigid flatfoot are the two types of flatfoot.

A person has flexible flatfoot if when sitting or standing on their toes, they have an arch that disappears when they stand with the entire foot on the ground. Flexible flatfoot may also be called “pediatric flatfoot” because the condition first appears in childhood. It is common among infants because the arch does not develop until the age of 5 or 6 years. Rigid flatfoot is not as common in children as it is with adults. This type of flatfoot is developed due to the weakening of tibialis posterior muscle tendon, a major supporting structure of the foot arch. Development of this deformity is progressive and shows early signs of pain and swelling that begins at the inside arch of the foot and moves to the outside of the foot below the ankle. More severe cases can possibly lead to arthritis of the foot and ankle joints.

Although most cases of flatfoot involve people born with the condition, some less common causes are obesity, diabetes, pregnancy, and osteoporosis. In some cases, flatfoot may come with no symptoms at all and does not require any type of treatment. With other cases though, symptoms may include pain in the shin, knee, hips and lower back. If a person with flatfeet experiences such symptoms, a health care provider may suggest using orthotic devices or arch supports, which may reduce the pain. Wearing supportive shoes can also prove more comfortable with flatfeet and staying away from shoes with little support such as sandals. Other methods to relieve pain also include stretching the Achilles tendon properly and using proper form when doing any physical activity. In addition, losing weight can reduce the stress on your feet and reduce the pain.

Tuesday, 12 September 2023 00:00

Understanding Flat Feet and Easing the Pain

Flat feet, medically known as pes planus, is a common condition where the arches of the feet appear flattened, causing the entire sole to make contact with the ground. Flat feet can be a result of genetics, injury, or muscle weakness. While many individuals with flat feet may not experience pain, others can suffer from discomfort and fatigue, especially during prolonged periods of standing or physical activity. Fortunately, there are steps that can be taken which may help to alleviate flat feet pain. This can begin by wearing supportive shoes with arch support and cushioning. Custom orthotic inserts can also provide additional support and comfort. Stretching exercises for the Achilles tendon and calf muscles can help improve foot flexibility. Additionally, performing strengthening exercises for the foot and ankle muscles can enhance arch support. By addressing flat feet and taking proactive measures, you can find relief from discomfort and improve your overall foot health. If you have flat feet, it is suggested that you visit a podiatrist who can guide you toward additional relief options.

Flatfoot is a condition many people suffer from. If you have flat feet, contact Dale Delaney, DPM from InStride Kinston Podiatry Center. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Are Flat Feet?

Flatfoot is a condition in which the arch of the foot is depressed and the sole of the foot is almost completely in contact with the ground. About 20-30% of the population generally has flat feet because their arches never formed during growth.

Conditions & Problems:

Having flat feet makes it difficult to run or walk because of the stress placed on the ankles.

Alignment – The general alignment of your legs can be disrupted, because the ankles move inward which can cause major discomfort.

Knees – If you have complications with your knees, flat feet can be a contributor to arthritis in that area.  

Symptoms

  • Pain around the heel or arch area
  • Trouble standing on the tip toe
  • Swelling around the inside of the ankle
  • Flat look to one or both feet
  • Having your shoes feel uneven when worn

Treatment

If you are experiencing pain and stress on the foot you may weaken the posterior tibial tendon, which runs around the inside of the ankle. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Kinston, NC . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 05 September 2023 00:00

How to Deal with Athlete's Foot

Athlete’s foot is a type of fungal infection that affects the skin on the feet. It is caused when the tinea fungus grows on the foot. It is possible to catch the fungus through direct contact with someone who has it or by touching a surface that is contaminated with it. This type of fungus thrives in warm, moist environments such as showers, locker room floors, and swimming pools. Your risk of getting it may also increase by wearing tight-fitting, closed-toe shoes, or by having sweaty feet.

Symptoms of athlete’s foot include itching, stinging or burning sensations between the toes. You may also experience toenails that are discolored, thick, crumbly, or toenails that pull away from the nail bed.

Your podiatrist may diagnose athlete’s foot by detecting these symptoms or by doing a skin test to see if there is a fungal infection present. The most common exam used to detect Athlete’s foot is a skin lesion potassium hydroxide exam. To use this method, your doctor will scrape off a small area of the infected skin and place it into potassium hydroxide. The potassium hydroxide will destroy the normal cells and leave the fungal cells untouched so that they are visible under a microscope.

There are a variety of treatment options for athlete’s foot. Some medications are miconazole (Desenex), terbinafine (Lamisil AT), clotrimazole (Lotrimin AF), butenafine (Lotrimin Ultra), and tolnaftate (Tinactin). While these options may be able to treat your fungus, it is best that you consult with a podiatrist in order to see which treatment option may work best for you.

In some cases, Athlete’s foot may lead to complications. A severe complication would be a secondary bacterial infection which may cause your foot to become swollen, painful, and hot.

There are ways that you can prevent athlete’s foot. Washing your feet with soap and water each day and drying them thoroughly is an effective way to prevent infections. You also shouldn’t share socks, shoes, or towels with other people. It is crucial that you wear shower sandals in public showers, around swimming pools, and in other public places. Additionally, you should make sure you wear shoes that can breathe and change your socks when your feet become sweaty. If you suspect that you have Athlete’s foot, you should seek help from a podiatrist as soon as possible.

Athletes' foot, a common fungal infection affecting the feet, can throw a wrench in the most active lifestyles. This condition is often caused by the trichophyton fungus, which thrives in warm, damp environments. The symptoms of athlete’s foot can include itching, burning, and cracked skin, particularly between the toes. As uncomfortable as this condition is, relief is within reach. Treatments can range from over-the-counter antifungal creams to prescription medications, effectively combating the infection. However, prevention is key. Keeping the feet clean and dry, wearing moisture-wicking socks, and opting for breathable footwear can create an unwelcoming environment for the fungus. Regularly changing socks, avoiding shared damp surfaces such as locker room floors, and choosing open-toed shoes in communal areas are also prudent steps toward sidestepping this irritating foot condition. If you have developed athlete’s foot, it is strongly suggested that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can guide you toward effective treatment and relief techniques. 

Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is often an uncomfortable condition to experience. Thankfully, podiatrists specialize in treating athlete’s foot and offer the best treatment options. If you have any questions about athlete’s foot, consult with Dale Delaney, DPM from InStride Kinston Podiatry Center. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality treatment.

What Is Athlete’s Foot?

Tinea pedis, more commonly known as athlete’s foot, is a non-serious and common fungal infection of the foot. Athlete’s foot is contagious and can be contracted by touching someone who has it or infected surfaces. The most common places contaminated by it are public showers, locker rooms, and swimming pools. Once contracted, it grows on feet that are left inside moist, dark, and warm shoes and socks.

Prevention

The most effective ways to prevent athlete’s foot include:

  • Thoroughly washing and drying feet
  • Avoid going barefoot in locker rooms and public showers
  • Using shower shoes in public showers
  • Wearing socks that allow the feet to breathe
  • Changing socks and shoes frequently if you sweat a lot

Symptoms

Athlete’s foot initially occurs as a rash between the toes. However, if left undiagnosed, it can spread to the sides and bottom of the feet, toenails, and if touched by hand, the hands themselves. Symptoms include:

  • Redness
  • Burning
  • Itching
  • Scaly and peeling skin

Diagnosis and Treatment

Diagnosis is quick and easy. Skin samples will be taken and either viewed under a microscope or sent to a lab for testing. Sometimes, a podiatrist can diagnose it based on simply looking at it. Once confirmed, treatment options include oral and topical antifungal medications.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Kinston, NC . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Friday, 01 September 2023 00:00

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