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Tuesday, 05 July 2022 00:00

Pain in one’s toes can interfere with a running routine. Toe injuries while running can heal in a short amount of time with care and rest, but a more serious problem with a toe may derail a runner’s routine and set them back for longer than comfortable. Common toe problems in runners range from mild blisters to more serious hammertoes and stress fractures. A blister is caused by friction between the skin and shoes or socks. The outer layer of the skin separates from the inner layer and fills with lymph fluid. These are most common when a runner wears new shoes for the first time or increases their mileage. A hammertoe causes one or more of the smaller toes to bend upward. A corn or callus can develop on top of such a toe causing it to rub against shoes and the toe joint(s) can become swollen and painful. Stress fractures are common in teen athletes and are a result of overdoing runs. If a toenail becomes painful and begins to blacken, it might be runner’s toe. This is when the nail is under pressure because a shoe is too tight, or the toe is impacted repeatedly while running. Pressure causes friction between the nail and surrounding tissue. Fluid accumulates and blood capillaries break, causing the toenail to change color and pain to come on. The blackened toenail will eventually fall off, but this could take months. If you are a runner and you have toe pain, consult with a podiatrist who can diagnose the problem and determine how to best treat it.

Sports related foot and ankle injuries require proper treatment before players can go back to their regular routines. For more information, contact Dale Delaney, DPM of InStride Kinston Podiatry Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Sports Related Foot and Ankle Injuries

Foot and ankle injuries are a common occurrence when it comes to athletes of any sport. While many athletes dismiss the initial aches and pains, the truth is that ignoring potential foot and ankle injuries can lead to serious problems. As athletes continue to place pressure and strain the area further, a mild injury can turn into something as serious as a rupture and may lead to a permanent disability. There are many factors that contribute to sports related foot and ankle injuries, which include failure to warm up properly, not providing support or wearing bad footwear. Common injuries and conditions athletes face, including:

  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Plantar Fasciosis
  • Achilles Tendinitis
  • Achilles Tendon Rupture
  • Ankle Sprains

Sports related injuries are commonly treated using the RICE method. This includes rest, applying ice to the injured area, compression and elevating the ankle. More serious sprains and injuries may require surgery, which could include arthroscopic and reconstructive surgery. Rehabilitation and therapy may also be required in order to get any recovering athlete to become fully functional again. Any unusual aches and pains an athlete sustains must be evaluated by a licensed, reputable medical professional.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Kinston, NC . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 28 June 2022 00:00

The Achilles tendon is a band of tissue that runs down the back of your leg and connects the calf muscle to the heel. Its main job is to lift the heel so you can walk, run, and jump. When the Achilles tendon is overused, it can result in either tendonitis or tendinosis. Achilles tendonitis is especially common among athletes, laborers who spend a lot of time on their feet, and people who exercise infrequently. Symptoms may consist of pain, tenderness, stiffness, or soreness at the back of the heel. Tendonitis is an inflammation usually caused by a sudden increase in repetitive activity and normally is short-lived once you cease the activity. If ignored or neglected, however, it can become Achilles tendonosis, a far more serious condition. This may result in minor tears that degenerate the tendon and can eventually cause it to rupture. If you believe you have injured your Achilles tendon, please consult with a podiatrist who can properly diagnose the severity of your condition and offer the appropriate treatment options.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Dale Delaney, DPM of InStride Kinston Podiatry Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Kinston, NC . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 21 June 2022 00:00

In addition to the many bones, tendons, ligaments, and muscles found in the foot, it also contains bursa. These sacs of fluid act as cushions between tendons, muscles, and bones, and can be found in the heel. When a bursa becomes inflamed, it is called bursitis. There are two types of heel bursitis, retrocalcaneal and subcutaneous calcaneal. Retrocalcaneal bursa are found in the back of the ankle near the heel. When it becomes inflamed, it can be mistaken for Achilles tendonitis because it develops behind the heel. It is caused by overuse or repetitive activity – too much walking, running, or jumping. It can be set off by changes in the level of activity, improper training, or a history of arthritis. Subcutaneous calcaneal bursitis is the result of a thinning of the heel pad, and the pain seems to radiate from inside the heel. Ill-fitting footwear, being overweight, stress fractures, and tumors on the foot all can contribute to heel bursitis. If you are experiencing heel pain, it is suggested you consult a podiatrist for a complete examination to determine the cause and find the appropriate treatment options. 


 

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact Dale Delaney, DPM of InStride Kinston Podiatry Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact our office located in Kinston, NC . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 14 June 2022 00:00

Bunions may be prevented from developing. A bunion is defined as a bony protrusion on the side of the big toe and can gradually occur from wearing shoes that do not fit correctly. In severe cases, the bunion can cause the other toes to overlap, and this may cause difficulty in walking and completing daily activities. Some of the suggested ways to prevent bunions from developing can include wearing shoes that have adequate room for the toes to move freely as well as avoiding high heels. It can be beneficial to frequently rest the feet as this can provide the opportunity to stretch the toes. If the bunion is painful, it may feel better to wear a protective pad on top of it which may aid in reducing the pressure against the shoe. When a bunion is severe, surgery may be a necessary option for permanent relief. If you notice the beginning stages of a developing bunion, it is suggested that you contact a podiatrist who can offer the correct treatment options. 

If you are suffering from bunion pain, contact Dale Delaney, DPM of InStride Kinston Podiatry Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

Bunions are painful bony bumps that usually develop on the inside of the foot at the joint of the big toe. As the deformity increases over time, it may become painful to walk and wear shoes. Women are more likely to exacerbate existing bunions since they often wear tight, narrow shoes that shift their toes together. Bunion pain can be relieved by wearing wider shoes with enough room for the toes.

Causes

  • Genetics – some people inherit feet that are more prone to bunion development
  • Inflammatory Conditions - rheumatoid arthritis and polio may cause bunion development

Symptoms

  • Redness and inflammation
  • Pain and tenderness
  • Callus or corns on the bump
  • Restricted motion in the big toe

In order to diagnose your bunion, your podiatrist may ask about your medical history, symptoms, and general health. Your doctor might also order an x-ray to take a closer look at your feet. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthotics, padding, icing, changes in footwear, and medication. If nonsurgical treatments don’t alleviate your bunion pain, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Kinston, NC . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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