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April 2020

Monday, 27 April 2020 00:00

How Can an Achilles Tendon Injury Occur?

Many people are unaware that the Achilles tendon is the strongest tendon in the body. It can become easily damaged among people who frequently participate in running and jumping activities. This tendon connects the calf muscles to the heel, and a sudden injury can cause severe pain and discomfort. Additionally, it may gradually endure wear and tear, and may become inflamed. If an injury is the cause of an Achilles tendon rupture, there may be a loud cracking sound that is heard at the time of the mishap. After a proper diagnosis is performed, which generally involves having an MRI or ultrasound taken, the correct treatment can begin. If you have an Achilles tendon injury, it is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist as quickly as possible who can help you with determining the best treatment techniques.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Dale Delaney, DPM of InStride Kinston Podiatry Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Kinston, NC. We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What are Achilles Tendon Injuries
Monday, 20 April 2020 00:00

Where Is the Plantar Fascia?

Research has indicated that many cases of plantar fasciitis do not occur as a result of a traumatic injury. The plantar fascia is a portion of tissue that runs along the bottom of the foot, and connects the heels to the toes. If it tears or becomes inflamed, plantar fasciitis can develop, and this may cause severe pain and discomfort. Many people who are afflicted with this condition will gradually experience this ailment, and it can happen from standing on hard surfaces for extended periods of time throughout the day. Additionally, wearing shoes that do not fit correctly may play a significant role in developing plantar fasciitis. There are a variety of methods to treat this condition. If you have heel pain, and think it may indicate plantar fasciitis, it is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can offer treatment options that are best for you.

Plantar fasciitis can be very painful and inconvenient. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Dale Delaney, DPM  from InStride Kinston Podiatry Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, known as the plantar fascia, and causes mild to severe heel pain.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Non-supportive shoes
  • Overpronation
  • Repeated stretching and tearing of the plantar fascia

How Can It Be Treated?

  • Conservative measures – anti-inflammatories, ice packs, stretching exercises, physical therapy, orthotic devices
  • Shockwave therapy – sound waves are sent to the affected area to facilitate healing and are usually used for chronic cases of plantar fasciitis
  • Surgery – usually only used as a last resort when all else fails. The plantar fascia can be surgically detached from the heel

While very treatable, plantar fasciitis is definitely not something that should be ignored. Especially in severe cases, speaking to your doctor right away is highly recommended to avoid complications and severe heel pain. Your podiatrist can work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options tailored to your condition.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Kinston, NC. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis

Suffering from this type of pain? You may have the foot condition known as Morton's neuroma. Morton's neuroma may develop as a result of ill-fitting footwear and existing foot deformities. We can help.

One of the most well known fungal foot conditions is athlete’s foot. This condition is a contagious skin infection that, as its name suggests, tends to primarily affect athletes. Because athletes’ are likely to get sweaty, hot feet while partaking in their sporting activity, their footwear becomes a space that fungus can likely thrive and grow in due to the dark, moist environment. Some common symptoms of this condition may include an irritating rash on the affected foot, dry skin, and psoriasis. For more information on what symptoms to look out for, it’s suggested to ask a podiatrist.

Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is often an uncomfortable condition to experience. Thankfully, podiatrists specialize in treating athlete’s foot and offer the best treatment options. If you have any questions about athlete’s foot, consult with Dale Delaney, DPM from InStride Kinston Podiatry Center. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality treatment.

What Is Athlete’s Foot?

Tinea pedis, more commonly known as athlete’s foot, is a non-serious and common fungal infection of the foot. Athlete’s foot is contagious and can be contracted by touching someone who has it or infected surfaces. The most common places contaminated by it are public showers, locker rooms, and swimming pools. Once contracted, it grows on feet that are left inside moist, dark, and warm shoes and socks.

Prevention

The most effective ways to prevent athlete’s foot include:

  • Thoroughly washing and drying feet
  • Avoid going barefoot in locker rooms and public showers
  • Using shower shoes in public showers
  • Wearing socks that allow the feet to breathe
  • Changing socks and shoes frequently if you sweat a lot

Symptoms

Athlete’s foot initially occurs as a rash between the toes. However, if left undiagnosed, it can spread to the sides and bottom of the feet, toenails, and if touched by hand, the hands themselves. Symptoms include:

  • Redness
  • Burning
  • Itching
  • Scaly and peeling skin

Diagnosis and Treatment

Diagnosis is quick and easy. Skin samples will be taken and either viewed under a microscope or sent to a lab for testing. Sometimes, a podiatrist can diagnose it based on simply looking at it. Once confirmed, treatment options include oral and topical antifungal medications.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Kinston, NC. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Athlete's Foot
Monday, 06 April 2020 00:00

Common Symptoms of Corns

If you have noticed a thickened layer of skin, often appearing in a small, ball-like shape, you may have developed a foot condition known as a corn. Corns generally form due to excess pressure put on the soles of the feet, and are known to be recurring if not properly treated. Corns are generally sore to the touch and may become increasingly more painful overtime. To help treat this condition, it may be beneficial to wear corn caps, have cryosurgery performed, or wear shoe inserts for extra support and cushion. Some patients have found soaking their feet in warm water followed by filing their corn with a pumice stone to be helpful in relieving discomfort. To determine which treatment option is best for you, and to prevent corns from recurring, it’s suggested you consult with your local podiatrist.

Corns can make walking very painful and should be treated immediately. If you have questions regarding your feet and ankles, contact Dale Delaney, DPM of InStride Kinston Podiatry Center. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? And How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns are thickened areas on the skin that can become painful. They are caused by excessive pressure and friction on the skin. Corns press into the deeper layers of the skin and are usually round in shape.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as:

  • Wearing properly fitting shoes that have been measured by a professional
  • Wearing shoes that are not sharply pointed or have high heels
  • Wearing only shoes that offer support

Treating Corns

Although most corns slowly disappear when the friction or pressure stops, this isn’t always the case. Consult with your podiatrist to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Kinston, NC. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Understanding Corns and Calluses
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